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Original article
Plasma citrate concentration: a possible biomarker for glaucoma in children
  1. Marta Michalczuk1,
  2. Porowski Tadeusz2,
  3. Beata Urban1,
  4. Wasilewska Anna2,
  5. Alina Bakunowicz- Łazarczyk1
  1. 1 Department of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland
  2. 2 Department of Pediatrics and Nephrology, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland
  1. Correspondence to Dr Marta Michalczuk; martaa.michalczuk{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives The main aim of the present study was to examine a possible role of plasma and urine citrate levels as glaucoma indicators in school-aged children with glaucoma diagnosis.

Patients 34 school-aged children with a glaucoma diagnosis (mean age 15.69±1.86 years) were qualified for the study group and 34 patients with no ophthalmological ailments were qualified for the control group (mean age 16.1±1.98 years). Plasma and urine citrate levels in the study and the control group (Kruskal-Wallis test) were compared.

Results Plasma citrate levels in the study (16.33±4.51 mg/L) and the control group (19.11±3.66 mg/L) were different; the statistical significance (p=0.0036). Plasma citrate concentrations were significantly lower in the study group in comparison with the control group. There were no statistically important differences between the study group (291.12±259.13 mg/24 hours; 275.82±217.57 mg/g) and the control group (434.88±357.66 mg/24 hours; 329.81±383.27 mg/g) including urine citrate level (p=0.052) and urine citrate to creatine ratio (p=0.4667).

Conclusion Plasma citrate concentration might be considered as glaucoma biomarker in paediatric population.

  • Ophthalmology
  • screening

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MM and PT: substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data; drafting; revising critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. BU, WA and AB-Ł: interpretation of data; revising critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

  • Funding None.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Detail has been removed from these case descriptions to ensure anonymity. However, the patient consent form approved by the University Ethics Committee has been signed by the guardian and the patient (>15 years old). The patient consent form was prepared in Polish. In this way, the patient consent form was understood by the guardian and the patient.

  • Ethics approval The University Ethics Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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