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Breastfeeding disruption during hospitalisation for bronchiolitis in children: a telephone survey
  1. Claire Heilbronner1,
  2. Emeline Roy2,
  3. Alice Hadchouel3,
  4. Sabrine Jebali4,
  5. Siwar Smii4,
  6. Alexandra Masson1,
  7. Sylvain Renolleau1,
  8. Virginie Rigourd4
  1. 1 Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Necker Hospital-Sick Children, Paris, France
  2. 2 Pediatric Department, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Necker Hospital-Sick Children, Paris, France
  3. 3 Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Necker Hospital-Sick Children, Paris, France
  4. 4 Region Ile de France Human Milk Bank, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Necker Hospital-Sick Children, Paris, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Claire Heilbronner; claire.heilbronner{at}aphp.fr

Abstract

Background Hospitalisation for an acute bronchiolitis might lead to unwanted weaning off breast feeding for several reasons (respiratory distress, use of enteral or parenteral feeding, mothers tiredness, among others), yet it has never been really evaluated or quantified.

Methods We conducted this telephone survey to evaluate breastfeeding disruption during hospitalisation for bronchiolitis and try to identify its determining factors for future interventions. This cross-sectional study extends over one epidemic season of bronchiolitis in a tertiary care hospital. All patients aged 6 months or younger hospitalised with acute bronchiolitis and receiving at least partial breast feeding were eligible for the study (n=144). Patients discharged home whose parents accepted to be contacted for a phone survey were included. Parents were contacted 3 months (range 0.5–6) after discharge.

Results Eighty-four patients were included in the study. Median length of hospital stay was 3 days (1; 34), and 27 patients spent some time in paediatric intensive care unit. Forty-three mothers stated that hospitalisation modified their breast feeding (17 stopped, 12 switched to partial breast feeding and 14 reduced without stopping). Mothers stated that the causes of breastfeeding disturbance were lack of support and advices (n=27) followed by child’s respiratory disease (n=14), logistic hospital difficulties (n=13) and personal organisation issues (n=4).

Conclusion Admission to hospital with bronchiolitis may adversely affect breast feeding. Correct advices and support could be a determining factor, and further studies should focus on preventive interventions.

  • bronchiolitis
  • breastfeeding
  • unwanted weaning

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CH conceptualised and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, analysed the data, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. ER, AH, AM and SR participated in patient’s selection and data collection, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. SS and SJ managed patient’s selection and interrogation, critically reviewed the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. VR helped conceptualise and design the study, coordinated and supervised data collection, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted.

  • Competing interests SJ and SS both received a grant from the Regional Agency for Health (ARS IDF) but have no other conflict of interest to disclose. The other authors have indicated that they have no financial relationships relevant to this article to disclose.

  • Ethics approval CER SFP.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional unpublished data from the study.

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