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Impact of chronic health conditions and injury on school performance and health outcomes in New South Wales, Australia: a retrospective record linkage study protocol
  1. Rebecca Mitchell1,
  2. Cate M Cameron2,3,
  3. Reidar P Lystad1,
  4. Olav Nielssen4,
  5. Anne McMaugh5,
  6. Geoffrey Herkes6,7,
  7. Carolyn Schniering8,
  8. Tien-Ming Hng9,10
  1. 1 Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Jamieson Trauma Institute, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  3. 3 School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  4. 4 Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  5. 5 Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  6. 6 Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  7. 7 Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  8. 8 Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  9. 9 Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Blacktown and Mount Druitt Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  10. 10 School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Rebecca Mitchell; r.mitchell{at}mq.edu.au

Abstract

Introduction Children who have sustained a serious injury or who have a chronic health condition, such as diabetes or epilepsy, may have their school performance adversely impacted by the condition, treatment of the condition and/or time away from school. Examining the potential adverse impact requires the identification of children most likely to be affected and the use of objective measures of education performance. This may highlight educational disparities that could be addressed with learning support. This study aims to examine education performance, school completion and health outcomes of children in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, who were hospitalised with an injury or a chronic health condition compared with children who have not been hospitalised for these conditions.

Method and analysis This research will be a retrospective population-level case-comparison study of hospitalised injured or chronically ill children (ie, diabetes, epilepsy, asthma or mental health conditions) aged ≤18 years in NSW, Australia, using linked health and education administrative data collections. It will examine the education performance, school completion and health outcomes of children who have been hospitalised in NSW with an injury or a chronic health condition compared with children randomly drawn from the NSW population (matched on gender, age and residential postcode) who have not been hospitalised for these conditions.

Ethics and dissemination The study received ethics approval from the NSW Population Health Services Research Ethics Committee (2018HRE0904). Findings from the research will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific conferences.

  • Epidemiology
  • Outcomes research
  • Adolescent Health

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RM, CMC and AM were involved in study design. RM wrote the first draft of the protocol, and all authors were involved in critical revision of the protocol.

  • Funding Philanthropic donor.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Ethical approval was obtained from the NSW Population Health Services Research Ethics Committee (HREA: 018HRE0904).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement No data are available.

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